Supernatural co-showrunner Andrew Dabb promises the series finale main storyline will arrive "unchanged" from what they originally had planned. Fans have been wondering for months if the public health crisis was going to effect the end of the long-running series. In August, star Jensen Ackles talked about some of the issues they were having before getting back together on set. "There have been some adjustments made from the scripts that we were going to shoot in March to the scripts that we're shooting now," Ackles said. "We've had to accommodate a pandemic."

After Jensen Ackles' comments started to spread around to Supernatural fans, there was a fear that the health crisis was going to effect how the show wrapped up 15 years-worth of storytelling. Thankfully, in a new interview, Andrew Dabb says the break "didn't affect the core parts" of the final two episodes. "We're still doing everything we wanted to do from a character, plot [and] mythology standpoint."

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However, like Jensen Ackles acknowledged, there were some adaptations that had to be made when the cast and crew were able to reunite. "In some cases, we had to simplify the [pathways] to get there," says Andrew Dabb. Even though Supernatural was able to go up to Vancouver, Canada and get back to work, they still had to follow strict safety guidelines, which meant that not everything they originally planned was going to be able to happen. Dabb explains.

"For example, for the finale, we had a big, super extravagant thing planned for that episode, and it wasn't feasible. But we found an alternative to get to the same place, plot-wise and, more importantly, emotionally, that worked great. So it's about being adaptable. We had to do some rewriting, but nothing that changed fundamentally what the show is or where it was going."

But, that does not mean there was a change to the story as a whole. "The storyline [for the series finale] is unchanged," Andrew Dabb reiterated. He continues, "Like I said, some of the scene work is different." As for the logistics, Dabb says it had to do with the amount of people on set at one time. "There aren't as many bad guys in a scene as we would normally have because of COVID restrictions. But in terms of plot, in terms of character, nothing is fundamentally different."

Supernatural season 15 will start back up again on October 8th. Thankfully, the series was able to get back to work, unlike a series like Empire, which was not able to shoot its final two episodes. The Winchester story will unfold as intended, though it won't be as extravagant as they originally intended when the final two episodes were being written. You can check out the rest of the interview with Andrew Dabb over at TV Line.

Kevin Burwick at TVweb
Kevin Burwick