Following the shocking cancellation of ABC's Roseanne over a controversially racist tweet from the show's star Roseanne Barr, actor Charlie Sheen took to Twitter to pitch the revival of Two and a Half Men.

Charlie Sheen opened his Tweet with a joyous farewell to Roseanne, saying "good riddance" to the show, followed by "Hashtag NOT Winning." Sheen then said that Roseanne's cancellation had cleared the runway for a Two and a Half Men revival. His tweet ended with the hashtag #CharlieHarperReturns. It was accompanied by a picture of the script for the episode "I Can't Afford Hyenas" from his show's first season.

In 2011, Charlie Sheen made headlines when he was sacked from the hit series following a number of drug problems and an even greater number of inappropriate public actions. The demise of his career is notably similar to Roseanne Barr, who also lost the hit series she starred in due to her inappropriate behavior on social media.

Two and a Half Men went on without Charlie Sheen until 2015, with Ashton Kutcher stepping in to replace Sheen. While Kutcher did not play Sheen's character Charlie Harper, he still filled every hole that Sheen's departure had left. This managed to make Sheen's end in the series feel less forced, with the network cleverly choosing to create a new character with new characteristics and opportunities rather than doing a simple recasting.

Two and a Half Men ended on a good note. Unlike many TV series, the showrunners knew that the series would be coming to an end, and wrapped up everything nicely in a finale episode that most fans seemed to enjoy. While a revival would be nice to see, it would be unlikely as it might ruin the perfect ending that already occurred only 3 years back.

However, even if Two and a Half Men did somehow get a revival, it would be difficult to bring back the character Charlie Harper, and not just because of how difficult Charlie Sheen was to work with during his later seasons. The finale episode of Two and a Half Men actually featured his character dying by being crushed by a piano. While this was clearly a joke moment, it would still be difficult for the writers to explain how Charlie could somehow come back to life in a later season.

Charlie's tweet was met with a relatively positive response, with thousands of retweets. He was even retweeted by Roseanne Barr herself, who the tweet blatantly spoke against. If the tweet builds up enough steam, showing that people really do want to see Charlie Sheen return to TV, it's possible that it could attract attention from a few major networks.

As great as it could be to see Charlie Harper go back to his old nonsensical ways in a revived Two and a Half Men as Charlie Sheen has pitched, it isn't very likely. Roseanne was certainly evidence of this, as the show's ratings and views dropped severely only a few weeks into its revival. The downfall of Roseanne may be enough to keep any major network from reviving a previously popular series with an unreliable star. Perhaps this situation is just a sign that new shows are the real future of television, and that revivals are not.